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   Now Be Here #1,   August 28, 2016, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, Ca.   I had a simple idea- a gathering and photograph of female and female identifying contemporary artists at a show of contemporary female sculptors, ‘Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016.’  It came together nicely since Hauser Wirth & Schimmel had the show which inspired the event, its own education department run by Aandrea Stang, the ideal courtyard space and the staff to pull this off!  I had been thinking a lot about the challenges and rewards of being fully present in the different aspects of one’s life.  This event was an opportunity to take a snapshot of all the female and female identifying working artists in the LA contemporary art community.  It was an opportunity for us to capture a moment where we stood with each other in all of our diversity.    

Now Be Here #1, August 28, 2016, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, Ca. 

I had a simple idea- a gathering and photograph of female and female identifying contemporary artists at a show of contemporary female sculptors, ‘Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016.’  It came together nicely since Hauser Wirth & Schimmel had the show which inspired the event, its own education department run by Aandrea Stang, the ideal courtyard space and the staff to pull this off!  I had been thinking a lot about the challenges and rewards of being fully present in the different aspects of one’s life.  This event was an opportunity to take a snapshot of all the female and female identifying working artists in the LA contemporary art community.  It was an opportunity for us to capture a moment where we stood with each other in all of our diversity. 

 

  Book Truck #1,  Mixed media with borrowed print media, 2016. Installation view at Chimento Contemporary   Book Truck #1 invites local Los Angeles artists and curators to lend whatever book they are currently excited about or using as research for the temporary reading cart.  The books will be housed for the duration of the exhibition on a specifically constructed book cart, and each item will be cataloged with a card containing lender information. Visitors to the gallery will be provided a comfortable place to sit and peruse what Los Angeles artists and curators are currently look at and thinking about.  List of participants:  Jesse Aldana, John Baldessari, Kelly Barrie, Stephanie Barron, Linda Besemer, Elizabeta Betinski, Sally Bruno, Zoe Crosher, Kim Dingle, Martin Durazo, Ciara Ennis, Ruth Estevez, Marc Fichou, Morgan Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robert Fontenot, Jon Furmanski, Alexandra Grant, Eric Gero, Pat Gomez, Phyllis Green, Katie Grinnan, Sherin Guirguis, Micol Hebron, Michael Ned Holte, Stephanie Holz, Margaret Honda, Marc Horowitz, Dion Johnson, Leslie Jones, Carole Ann Klonarides, Alice Könitz, Rachel Lachowicz, Liz Larner, Laura London, Mara Lonner, Rebecca Morse, Sandeep Mukherjee, Lexi Murray, Warren Neidich, Kristina Newhouse, Christine Nguyen, Rebecca Niederlander,  Stas Orlovski, Laura Owens, Chris Pate, Renee Petropoulos, Glenn Phillips, Allie Pohl, Nancy Popp, Pam Posey, Antonio A. Puleo, Monique Prieto, Stephanie Pryor, Fay Ray, Rob Reynolds, Alma Ruiz, David Schafer, Kim Schoen, Rimas Simaitis, Rani Singh, Katie Sinnott, Aandrea Stang,  Susan Silton, Jay Stuckey, Mungo Thomson, Roy Thurston, Elizabeth Tremante, Dani Tull, Anu Vikram, Evans Wittenberg, Mario Ybara, Kevin Young, Bari Zipperstein. 

Book Truck #1,  Mixed media with borrowed print media, 2016. Installation view at Chimento Contemporary

Book Truck #1 invites local Los Angeles artists and curators to lend whatever book they are currently excited about or using as research for the temporary reading cart.  The books will be housed for the duration of the exhibition on a specifically constructed book cart, and each item will be cataloged with a card containing lender information. Visitors to the gallery will be provided a comfortable place to sit and peruse what Los Angeles artists and curators are currently look at and thinking about.

List of participants:

Jesse Aldana, John Baldessari, Kelly Barrie, Stephanie Barron, Linda Besemer, Elizabeta Betinski, Sally Bruno, Zoe Crosher, Kim Dingle, Martin Durazo, Ciara Ennis, Ruth Estevez, Marc Fichou, Morgan Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robert Fontenot, Jon Furmanski, Alexandra Grant, Eric Gero, Pat Gomez, Phyllis Green, Katie Grinnan, Sherin Guirguis, Micol Hebron, Michael Ned Holte, Stephanie Holz, Margaret Honda, Marc Horowitz, Dion Johnson, Leslie Jones, Carole Ann Klonarides, Alice Könitz, Rachel Lachowicz, Liz Larner, Laura London, Mara Lonner, Rebecca Morse, Sandeep Mukherjee, Lexi Murray, Warren Neidich, Kristina Newhouse, Christine Nguyen, Rebecca Niederlander,  Stas Orlovski, Laura Owens, Chris Pate, Renee Petropoulos, Glenn Phillips, Allie Pohl, Nancy Popp, Pam Posey, Antonio A. Puleo, Monique Prieto, Stephanie Pryor, Fay Ray, Rob Reynolds, Alma Ruiz, David Schafer, Kim Schoen, Rimas Simaitis, Rani Singh, Katie Sinnott, Aandrea Stang,  Susan Silton, Jay Stuckey, Mungo Thomson, Roy Thurston, Elizabeth Tremante, Dani Tull, Anu Vikram, Evans Wittenberg, Mario Ybara, Kevin Young, Bari Zipperstein. 

IMG_9995.JPG
 Painted Over/Under, 2011/12, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Ca. (more images:  Here )  Kim Schoenstadt’s Painted Over/Under Parts 1-4 is a year-long project based on the mismatched color patterning created by the “graffiti maintenance” on freeway retaining walls and other open walls in the city. Parts 1-3 will incorporate guest curators, Les Figues Press, Jens Hoffman and Erin Cullerton who will invite writers, artists and architects to create drawings in shifts on the walls in LACE’s rear gallery. With each part of the project works will be written and/or drawn onto the walls, then painted over with Schoenstadt’s color palette, creating a layered, abstracted painting defined by the shapes of past projects, offering a new starting point for the next group, and so on. Schoenstadt will apply portions of a large wall drawing with tape prior to each “painting out” preserving the work below. Part 4 will reveal the complete drawing constructed out of fragments from history of the project.

Painted Over/Under, 2011/12, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Ca. (more images: Here)

Kim Schoenstadt’s Painted Over/Under Parts 1-4 is a year-long project based on the mismatched color patterning created by the “graffiti maintenance” on freeway retaining walls and other open walls in the city. Parts 1-3 will incorporate guest curators, Les Figues Press, Jens Hoffman and Erin Cullerton who will invite writers, artists and architects to create drawings in shifts on the walls in LACE’s rear gallery. With each part of the project works will be written and/or drawn onto the walls, then painted over with Schoenstadt’s color palette, creating a layered, abstracted painting defined by the shapes of past projects, offering a new starting point for the next group, and so on. Schoenstadt will apply portions of a large wall drawing with tape prior to each “painting out” preserving the work below. Part 4 will reveal the complete drawing constructed out of fragments from history of the project.

  Tell Me Something Good , 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images  Here )  Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition  Art By Telephone  (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.  The original 1969  Art By Telephone  was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.  The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.  Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.  McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.  The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969  Art By Telephone . The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.  SMMOA has become -> LAICA

Tell Me Something Good, 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images Here)

Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition Art By Telephone (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.

The original 1969 Art By Telephone was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.

The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.

Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.

McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.

The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969 Art By Telephone. The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.

SMMOA has become ->LAICA

Installation #2.jpg
  Tell Me Something Good , 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images:  Here )  Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition  Art By Telephone  (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.  The original 1969  Art By Telephone  was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.  The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.  Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.  McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.  The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969  Art By Telephone . The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.

Tell Me Something Good, 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images: Here)

Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition Art By Telephone (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.

The original 1969 Art By Telephone was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.

The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.

Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.

McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.

The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969 Art By Telephone. The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.

  Can Control,  2006, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, Ca.  New Langton Arts, San Francisco project:  The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at New Langton with canvas and made a drawing with tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc.  At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.  Project Site:  Here

Can Control, 2006, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, Ca.

New Langton Arts, San Francisco project: 
The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at New Langton with canvas and made a drawing with tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc. 
At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.

Project Site: Here

 Can Controll, Eindhoven, 2007. Panel 1/9 (more images:  Here ) The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at the Van Abbemuseum with canvas and made a drawing with vinyl tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc.  At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.

Can Controll, Eindhoven, 2007. Panel 1/9 (more images: Here)
The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at the Van Abbemuseum with canvas and made a drawing with vinyl tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc. 
At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.

Now Be Here #1, August 28, 2016, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, Ca. 

I had a simple idea- a gathering and photograph of female and female identifying contemporary artists at a show of contemporary female sculptors, ‘Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016.’  It came together nicely since Hauser Wirth & Schimmel had the show which inspired the event, its own education department run by Aandrea Stang, the ideal courtyard space and the staff to pull this off!  I had been thinking a lot about the challenges and rewards of being fully present in the different aspects of one’s life.  This event was an opportunity to take a snapshot of all the female and female identifying working artists in the LA contemporary art community.  It was an opportunity for us to capture a moment where we stood with each other in all of our diversity. 

 

Book Truck #1,  Mixed media with borrowed print media, 2016. Installation view at Chimento Contemporary

Book Truck #1 invites local Los Angeles artists and curators to lend whatever book they are currently excited about or using as research for the temporary reading cart.  The books will be housed for the duration of the exhibition on a specifically constructed book cart, and each item will be cataloged with a card containing lender information. Visitors to the gallery will be provided a comfortable place to sit and peruse what Los Angeles artists and curators are currently look at and thinking about.

List of participants:

Jesse Aldana, John Baldessari, Kelly Barrie, Stephanie Barron, Linda Besemer, Elizabeta Betinski, Sally Bruno, Zoe Crosher, Kim Dingle, Martin Durazo, Ciara Ennis, Ruth Estevez, Marc Fichou, Morgan Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robert Fontenot, Jon Furmanski, Alexandra Grant, Eric Gero, Pat Gomez, Phyllis Green, Katie Grinnan, Sherin Guirguis, Micol Hebron, Michael Ned Holte, Stephanie Holz, Margaret Honda, Marc Horowitz, Dion Johnson, Leslie Jones, Carole Ann Klonarides, Alice Könitz, Rachel Lachowicz, Liz Larner, Laura London, Mara Lonner, Rebecca Morse, Sandeep Mukherjee, Lexi Murray, Warren Neidich, Kristina Newhouse, Christine Nguyen, Rebecca Niederlander,  Stas Orlovski, Laura Owens, Chris Pate, Renee Petropoulos, Glenn Phillips, Allie Pohl, Nancy Popp, Pam Posey, Antonio A. Puleo, Monique Prieto, Stephanie Pryor, Fay Ray, Rob Reynolds, Alma Ruiz, David Schafer, Kim Schoen, Rimas Simaitis, Rani Singh, Katie Sinnott, Aandrea Stang,  Susan Silton, Jay Stuckey, Mungo Thomson, Roy Thurston, Elizabeth Tremante, Dani Tull, Anu Vikram, Evans Wittenberg, Mario Ybara, Kevin Young, Bari Zipperstein. 

Painted Over/Under, 2011/12, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Ca. (more images: Here)

Kim Schoenstadt’s Painted Over/Under Parts 1-4 is a year-long project based on the mismatched color patterning created by the “graffiti maintenance” on freeway retaining walls and other open walls in the city. Parts 1-3 will incorporate guest curators, Les Figues Press, Jens Hoffman and Erin Cullerton who will invite writers, artists and architects to create drawings in shifts on the walls in LACE’s rear gallery. With each part of the project works will be written and/or drawn onto the walls, then painted over with Schoenstadt’s color palette, creating a layered, abstracted painting defined by the shapes of past projects, offering a new starting point for the next group, and so on. Schoenstadt will apply portions of a large wall drawing with tape prior to each “painting out” preserving the work below. Part 4 will reveal the complete drawing constructed out of fragments from history of the project.

Tell Me Something Good, 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images Here)

Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition Art By Telephone (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.

The original 1969 Art By Telephone was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.

The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.

Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.

McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.

The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969 Art By Telephone. The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.

SMMOA has become ->LAICA

Tell Me Something Good, 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images: Here)

Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition Art By Telephone (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.

The original 1969 Art By Telephone was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.

The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.

Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.

McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.

The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969 Art By Telephone. The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale. Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.

Can Control, 2006, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, Ca.

New Langton Arts, San Francisco project: 
The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at New Langton with canvas and made a drawing with tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc. 
At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.

Project Site: Here

Can Controll, Eindhoven, 2007. Panel 1/9 (more images: Here)
The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at the Van Abbemuseum with canvas and made a drawing with vinyl tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc. 
At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.

   Now Be Here #1,   August 28, 2016, Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, Ca.   I had a simple idea- a gathering and photograph of female and female identifying contemporary artists at a show of contemporary female sculptors, ‘Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947-2016.’  It came together nicely since Hauser Wirth & Schimmel had the show which inspired the event, its own education department run by Aandrea Stang, the ideal courtyard space and the staff to pull this off!  I had been thinking a lot about the challenges and rewards of being fully present in the different aspects of one’s life.  This event was an opportunity to take a snapshot of all the female and female identifying working artists in the LA contemporary art community.  It was an opportunity for us to capture a moment where we stood with each other in all of our diversity.    
  Book Truck #1,  Mixed media with borrowed print media, 2016. Installation view at Chimento Contemporary   Book Truck #1 invites local Los Angeles artists and curators to lend whatever book they are currently excited about or using as research for the temporary reading cart.  The books will be housed for the duration of the exhibition on a specifically constructed book cart, and each item will be cataloged with a card containing lender information. Visitors to the gallery will be provided a comfortable place to sit and peruse what Los Angeles artists and curators are currently look at and thinking about.  List of participants:  Jesse Aldana, John Baldessari, Kelly Barrie, Stephanie Barron, Linda Besemer, Elizabeta Betinski, Sally Bruno, Zoe Crosher, Kim Dingle, Martin Durazo, Ciara Ennis, Ruth Estevez, Marc Fichou, Morgan Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robert Fontenot, Jon Furmanski, Alexandra Grant, Eric Gero, Pat Gomez, Phyllis Green, Katie Grinnan, Sherin Guirguis, Micol Hebron, Michael Ned Holte, Stephanie Holz, Margaret Honda, Marc Horowitz, Dion Johnson, Leslie Jones, Carole Ann Klonarides, Alice Könitz, Rachel Lachowicz, Liz Larner, Laura London, Mara Lonner, Rebecca Morse, Sandeep Mukherjee, Lexi Murray, Warren Neidich, Kristina Newhouse, Christine Nguyen, Rebecca Niederlander,  Stas Orlovski, Laura Owens, Chris Pate, Renee Petropoulos, Glenn Phillips, Allie Pohl, Nancy Popp, Pam Posey, Antonio A. Puleo, Monique Prieto, Stephanie Pryor, Fay Ray, Rob Reynolds, Alma Ruiz, David Schafer, Kim Schoen, Rimas Simaitis, Rani Singh, Katie Sinnott, Aandrea Stang,  Susan Silton, Jay Stuckey, Mungo Thomson, Roy Thurston, Elizabeth Tremante, Dani Tull, Anu Vikram, Evans Wittenberg, Mario Ybara, Kevin Young, Bari Zipperstein. 
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 Painted Over/Under, 2011/12, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, Ca. (more images:  Here )  Kim Schoenstadt’s Painted Over/Under Parts 1-4 is a year-long project based on the mismatched color patterning created by the “graffiti maintenance” on freeway retaining walls and other open walls in the city. Parts 1-3 will incorporate guest curators, Les Figues Press, Jens Hoffman and Erin Cullerton who will invite writers, artists and architects to create drawings in shifts on the walls in LACE’s rear gallery. With each part of the project works will be written and/or drawn onto the walls, then painted over with Schoenstadt’s color palette, creating a layered, abstracted painting defined by the shapes of past projects, offering a new starting point for the next group, and so on. Schoenstadt will apply portions of a large wall drawing with tape prior to each “painting out” preserving the work below. Part 4 will reveal the complete drawing constructed out of fragments from history of the project.
  Tell Me Something Good , 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images  Here )  Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition  Art By Telephone  (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.  The original 1969  Art By Telephone  was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.  The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.  Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.  McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.  The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969  Art By Telephone . The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.  SMMOA has become -> LAICA
Installation #2.jpg
  Tell Me Something Good , 2009, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, ca. (more images:  Here )  Inspired by the conceptual art exhibition  Art By Telephone  (Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1969), in which participants phoned in their specifications for their works of art, artists Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride will exchange instructions to create their respective artworks in their first two-person U.S. Museum exhibition.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  opens at the Santa Monica Museum of Art on September 12 and will be on view through December 5, 2009.  The original 1969  Art By Telephone  was curated by Jan van der Marck. Its basic premise was to invite international and out-of-state artists to phone instructions that would be executed bymuseum installers. Schoenstadt and McBride have created their ‘exchange’ as a variation of the 1969 project, with each phoning the other with instructions for a work. At SMMoA, Schoenstadt will create McBride’s work according to the instructions – photographs of all the gas stations along California Highway 1 between Los Angeles International Airport and Point Dume. McBride was asked by Schoenstadt to choose a discarded drawing from her studio and load it into a fax machine, then ask the Gallery to fax the floor plans of their proposed exhibition space. The combination of interposed drawing and architectural plan provided the final composition. This work was shown at New York gallery Alexander and Bonin from May 9 through June 13, 2009.  The project takes up the “telephone game” idea of transforming visual information into language and back to visual, and also embraces the conceptual promise that ‘anyone’ can make an art work based on the idea of the systemic production of art according to instruction. In the current era of instant messaging and social media, Schoenstadt and McBride use the telephone as a means of communication to initiate their conceptual works that explore the ramifications of what happens when an artist gives up control over his or her project. With its focus on collaboration and exploration of the nature of authorship, this exhibition is the perfect complement to the Allen Ruppersberg exhibition, which runs concurrently at SMMoA.  Schoenstadt received a BFA from Pitzer College, California, and has participated in many solo and two-person exhibitions and projects in Europe and the U.S., including the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. Her body of work centers around the exploration of drawing, and frequently includes series in which the final product is arrived at by chance or by instructions provided either via the audience or other artists; her works are often site-specific. Schoenstadt lives and works in Venice, California.  McBride received a BA from Bard College, New York, and an MFA from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia. She is the recipient of many awards and residencies, including the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2002). Her projects vary greatly from unorthodox books to large-scale sculptures. Her work has been shown at the SculptureCenter, New York, and she has had several solo museum exhibitions throughout Europe. McBride lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany where she is a professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf.  The catalog accompanying the project is a recording of each artist’s instructions on a vinyl record, just as it was for the original 1969  Art By Telephone . The record will be playing in the Project Room as part of the installation; a limited edition of signed copies will be available for sale.  Tell Me Something Good: A Collaboration between Kim Schoenstadt and Rita McBride  is organized by the Santa Monica Museum of Art and curator Lisa Melandri, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs.
  Can Control,  2006, New Langton Arts, San Francisco, Ca.  New Langton Arts, San Francisco project:  The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at New Langton with canvas and made a drawing with tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc.  At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.  Project Site:  Here
 Can Controll, Eindhoven, 2007. Panel 1/9 (more images:  Here ) The project titled Can Control, involves three activities that will blend to create one project. Activity one invites artists and curators from the US, Europe and Australia to email instructions to make a word, mark, or shape. For activity two, I  covered one of the walls at the Van Abbemuseum with canvas and made a drawing with vinyl tape. For the last activity, worked with local artists who use graffiti techniques to execute instructions from activity one using spray paint, marker, paint, etc.  At the end of five days I removed the taped lines to expose my drawing through the spray paint. This culmination of activities will produce a wall of graffiti with architecture imbedded within.