......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

YouTube

Short video from the Crossroads installation.

  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 1),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 1), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 1),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 1), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 2),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 2), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 2),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 2), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

 











  Parallel Version Series: Los Angeles (with extended si ght lines),   2013, wall drawing with snaplines and acrylic paint           

Parallel Version Series: Los Angeles (with extended sight lines), 2013, wall drawing with snaplines and acrylic paint

 


 

   Block Plan Series:
Noyes, Lautner, Niemeyer,   2013, wall drawing with acrylic paint, pen and three dimensional objects, 144 x 90 inches. 





  
Block Plan Series: Noyes, Lautner, Niemeyer, 2013, wall drawing with acrylic paint, pen and three dimensional objects, 144 x 90 inches.

 

   Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 2,   2012, paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable per location. 

Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 2, 2012, paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable per location. 

   Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 1,   2012, paint and ink on wall, dimension variable per location. 

Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 1, 2012, paint and ink on wall, dimension variable per location. 

   The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 2),   2012, ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location   

The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 2), 2012, ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location

 

   The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 1),   2012, Ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location.

The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 1), 2012, Ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location.

   Odd Lots Series: Salt Lake, Sinai, Los Angeles #3,    2011, paint and vinyl on wall and floor, dimensions variable- approximate dimension for this installation seen, 141 x 217.25 inches. 

Odd Lots Series: Salt Lake, Sinai, Los Angeles #3,  2011, paint and vinyl on wall and floor, dimensions variable- approximate dimension for this installation seen, 141 x 217.25 inches. 

   Fax Drawing #10 (Salt Lake Art Center, Utah  )     2011, Acrylic paint, ink and pen on wall, dimensions variable.   The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This was created on the occasion of the Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

Fax Drawing #10 (Salt Lake Art Center, Utah2011, Acrylic paint, ink and pen on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This was created on the occasion of the Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

     E-mail Drawing: Art Affairs (Amsterdam)     , 2011, Paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable.    The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This was created for Art Affairs, Amsterdam The painters were: gianni hilgemann  peter ruehle  torsten ruehle

 E-mail Drawing: Art Affairs (Amsterdam) , 2011, Paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This was created for Art Affairs, Amsterdam
The painters were:
gianni hilgemann 
peter ruehle 
torsten ruehle

   Fax Drawing: #9 (Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Paris)  , 2011, Ink and Paint on wall, dimensions variable.  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for the Michael Shamberg Exhibition Turtle at Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Pairs

Fax Drawing: #9 (Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Paris), 2011, Ink and Paint on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for the Michael Shamberg Exhibition Turtle at Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Pairs

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction),   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.  A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:  Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.  The museums renowned  MATRIX  program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.  Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer,  MATRIX  exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.  The first of its kind,  MATRIX  has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the  MATRIX  Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.  HISTORY    MATRIX  was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.  Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the name MATRIX , “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”  Andrea Miller-Keller became the first  MATRIX Gallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.  Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.  Since its first exhibition in January 1975,  MATRIX has shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.  For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their  MATRIX  show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.  Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their  MATRIX  experience.  Frequently, the  MATRIX  program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.   MATRIX  lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.  Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.  MATRIX   “artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.   

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:

Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.

The museums renowned MATRIX program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.

Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.

The first of its kind, MATRIX has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the MATRIX Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.
HISTORY

MATRIX was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.

Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the nameMATRIX, “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”

Andrea Miller-Keller became the first MATRIXGallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.

Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.

Since its first exhibition in January 1975, MATRIXhas shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.

For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their MATRIX show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.

Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their MATRIX experience.

Frequently, the MATRIX program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.

MATRIX lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.

Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.

MATRIX

 “artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.

 

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Installation View,          2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.  A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:  Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.  The museums renowned  MATRIX  program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.  Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer,  MATRIX  exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.  The first of its kind,  MATRIX  has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the  MATRIX  Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.  HISTORY    MATRIX  was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.  Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the name MATRIX , “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”  Andrea Miller-Keller became the first  MATRIX Gallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.  Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.  Since its first exhibition in January 1975,  MATRIX has shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.  For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their  MATRIX  show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.  Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their  MATRIX  experience.  Frequently, the  MATRIX  program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.   MATRIX  lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.  Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.  MATRIX  artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.  

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Installation View,  

2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:

Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.

The museums renowned MATRIX program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.

Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.

The first of its kind, MATRIX has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the MATRIX Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.
HISTORY

MATRIX was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.

Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the nameMATRIX, “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”

Andrea Miller-Keller became the first MATRIXGallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.

Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.

Since its first exhibition in January 1975, MATRIXhas shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.

For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their MATRIX show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.

Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their MATRIX experience.

Frequently, the MATRIX program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.

MATRIX lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.

Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.

MATRIX artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.

 

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.   

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

 

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

   Fax Drawing #4 (SECONDroom, Brussels) ,   2008, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for an exhibition with SECONDroom Gallery in Brussels. They exhibited all of the Fax Drawings to date.

Fax Drawing #4 (SECONDroom, Brussels) ,
2008, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for an exhibition with SECONDroom Gallery in Brussels. They exhibited all of the Fax Drawings to date.

     Fax Drawing #2 (Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica)      2007, pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for the Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica.

 Fax Drawing #2 (Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica) 

2007, pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for the Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica.

 Pool Side Chat: Googie and Social Realism in 7/8 time,  2005, Carved lines into plaster wall coated with chalkboard paint, gouache, and pencil, 123.5 x 189 inches/ 313.69 x 480.06 cm  Created for Surface Charge- an exhibition of works made directly on the wall at Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. The architectural elements are from Prague and Los Angeles. I had just finished participating in the Prague Biennale and was exploring some of the source material from that project.  MOCA  La now owns the large center drawing.

Pool Side Chat: Googie and Social Realism in 7/8 time, 
2005, Carved lines into plaster wall coated with chalkboard paint, gouache, and pencil, 123.5 x 189 inches/ 313.69 x 480.06 cm

Created for Surface Charge- an exhibition of works made directly on the wall at Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. The architectural elements are from Prague and Los Angeles. I had just finished participating in the Prague Biennale and was exploring some of the source material from that project. MOCA La now owns the large center drawing.

   Fax Drawing #1 (Jail gallery, Los Angeles)    2007, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions varriable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for Jail Gallery, Los Angeles, Ca.

Fax Drawing #1 (Jail gallery, Los Angeles) 
2007, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions varriable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for Jail Gallery, Los Angeles, Ca.

   Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes) ,   2007, Marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable  Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the  MCA  now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes), 
2007, Marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable

Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the MCA now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

 Detail view of second half of the wall for    Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes)  ,  2007, marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable  Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the  MCA  now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

Detail view of second half of the wall for

Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes)
2007, marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable

Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the MCA now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

     Diving Board Helix       2005, Gouache with oil stick on wall, 137 x 80 inches/ 347.98 x 203.2 cm

 Diving Board Helix 

2005, Gouache with oil stick on wall, 137 x 80 inches/ 347.98 x 203.2 cm

    7/8 Time Series: Roadside Destination (wide angle)    2005, Pen, pastel, and oil pastel on wall and floor, 72 x 264 inches/ 182.88 x 670.56 cm

7/8 Time Series: Roadside Destination (wide angle) 
2005, Pen, pastel, and oil pastel on wall and floor, 72 x 264 inches/ 182.88 x 670.56 cm

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

Tasting Kitchen Commission, 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.

YouTube

Short video from the Crossroads installation.

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Exercise in perspective, 2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 1), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 1), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 2), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 2), 2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.

Parallel Version Series: Los Angeles (with extended sight lines), 2013, wall drawing with snaplines and acrylic paint

 


 

Block Plan Series: Noyes, Lautner, Niemeyer, 2013, wall drawing with acrylic paint, pen and three dimensional objects, 144 x 90 inches.

 

Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 2, 2012, paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable per location. 

Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 1, 2012, paint and ink on wall, dimension variable per location. 

The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 2), 2012, ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location

 

The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 1), 2012, Ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location.

Odd Lots Series: Salt Lake, Sinai, Los Angeles #3,  2011, paint and vinyl on wall and floor, dimensions variable- approximate dimension for this installation seen, 141 x 217.25 inches. 

Fax Drawing #10 (Salt Lake Art Center, Utah2011, Acrylic paint, ink and pen on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This was created on the occasion of the Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art

 E-mail Drawing: Art Affairs (Amsterdam) , 2011, Paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This was created for Art Affairs, Amsterdam
The painters were:
gianni hilgemann 
peter ruehle 
torsten ruehle

Fax Drawing: #9 (Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Paris), 2011, Ink and Paint on wall, dimensions variable.

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for the Michael Shamberg Exhibition Turtle at Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Pairs

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:

Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.

The museums renowned MATRIX program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.

Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.

The first of its kind, MATRIX has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the MATRIX Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.
HISTORY

MATRIX was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.

Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the nameMATRIX, “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”

Andrea Miller-Keller became the first MATRIXGallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.

Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.

Since its first exhibition in January 1975, MATRIXhas shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.

For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their MATRIX show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.

Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their MATRIX experience.

Frequently, the MATRIX program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.

MATRIX lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.

Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.

MATRIX

 “artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.

 

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Installation View,  

2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:

Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.

The museums renowned MATRIX program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.

Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.

The first of its kind, MATRIX has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the MATRIX Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.
HISTORY

MATRIX was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.

Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the nameMATRIX, “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”

Andrea Miller-Keller became the first MATRIXGallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.

Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.

Since its first exhibition in January 1975, MATRIXhas shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.

For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their MATRIX show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.

Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their MATRIX experience.

Frequently, the MATRIX program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.

MATRIX lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.

Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.

MATRIX artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.

 

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

 

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view, 2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.

Fax Drawing #4 (SECONDroom, Brussels) ,
2008, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for an exhibition with SECONDroom Gallery in Brussels. They exhibited all of the Fax Drawings to date.

 Fax Drawing #2 (Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica) 

2007, pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for the Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica.

Pool Side Chat: Googie and Social Realism in 7/8 time, 
2005, Carved lines into plaster wall coated with chalkboard paint, gouache, and pencil, 123.5 x 189 inches/ 313.69 x 480.06 cm

Created for Surface Charge- an exhibition of works made directly on the wall at Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. The architectural elements are from Prague and Los Angeles. I had just finished participating in the Prague Biennale and was exploring some of the source material from that project. MOCA La now owns the large center drawing.

Fax Drawing #1 (Jail gallery, Los Angeles) 
2007, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions varriable

The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.

The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.

This one was created for Jail Gallery, Los Angeles, Ca.

Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes), 
2007, Marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable

Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the MCA now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

Detail view of second half of the wall for

Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes)
2007, marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable

Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the MCA now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.

 Diving Board Helix 

2005, Gouache with oil stick on wall, 137 x 80 inches/ 347.98 x 203.2 cm

7/8 Time Series: Roadside Destination (wide angle) 
2005, Pen, pastel, and oil pastel on wall and floor, 72 x 264 inches/ 182.88 x 670.56 cm

  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.
  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.
  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.
  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.
  Tasting Kitchen Commission , 2017, chalk on chalkboard, 4 x 21 feet.
YouTube
  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  
  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  
  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  
  Exercise in perspective,  2017, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and string, 12 x 50 feet.  
   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 1),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.
   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 1),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.
   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (detail from installation 2),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.
   Block Plan Series: Provo, Ut. (overall of installation 2),   2014, Three Dimensional drawing with acrylic paint, pen and wood on walls and false wall, 15’ x  136’ feet.
 











  Parallel Version Series: Los Angeles (with extended si ght lines),   2013, wall drawing with snaplines and acrylic paint           
   Block Plan Series:
Noyes, Lautner, Niemeyer,   2013, wall drawing with acrylic paint, pen and three dimensional objects, 144 x 90 inches. 





  
   Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 2,   2012, paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable per location. 
   Block Plan Series: Cologne/Munich/Brazil/Switzerland, 1,   2012, paint and ink on wall, dimension variable per location. 
   The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 2),   2012, ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location   
   The Prop Series: Munich/Brazil (Wall Drawing 1),   2012, Ink and paint on wall, dimensions variable per location.
   Odd Lots Series: Salt Lake, Sinai, Los Angeles #3,    2011, paint and vinyl on wall and floor, dimensions variable- approximate dimension for this installation seen, 141 x 217.25 inches. 
   Fax Drawing #10 (Salt Lake Art Center, Utah  )     2011, Acrylic paint, ink and pen on wall, dimensions variable.   The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This was created on the occasion of the Doctorow Prize for Contemporary Painting at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art
     E-mail Drawing: Art Affairs (Amsterdam)     , 2011, Paint and ink on wall, dimensions variable.    The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This was created for Art Affairs, Amsterdam The painters were: gianni hilgemann  peter ruehle  torsten ruehle
   Fax Drawing: #9 (Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Paris)  , 2011, Ink and Paint on wall, dimensions variable.  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for the Michael Shamberg Exhibition Turtle at Galerie Arnaud Lefebvre, Pairs
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction),   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.  A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:  Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.  The museums renowned  MATRIX  program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.  Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer,  MATRIX  exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.  The first of its kind,  MATRIX  has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the  MATRIX  Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.  HISTORY    MATRIX  was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.  Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the name MATRIX , “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”  Andrea Miller-Keller became the first  MATRIX Gallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.  Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.  Since its first exhibition in January 1975,  MATRIX has shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.  For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their  MATRIX  show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.  Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their  MATRIX  experience.  Frequently, the  MATRIX  program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.   MATRIX  lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.  Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.  MATRIX   “artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.   
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Installation View,          2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.  A bit about the Matrix exhibition from the Wadsworth Atheneum website:  Since its founding in 1844, the Wadsworth Atheneum has presented the artists of its own time, from Thomas Cole and Frederic Church to Salvador Dalí, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol and Sol LeWitt.  The museums renowned  MATRIX  program is a continuation of this artistic tradition and provides a forum for art that is challenging, current and sometimes controversial.  Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer,  MATRIX  exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities.  The first of its kind,  MATRIX  has since inspired more than fifty programs across the country, including: the  MATRIX  Program at the UC Berkeley Art Museum; Gallery One at the Corcoran Gallery of Art; Investigations at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania; Options at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Centric at the University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach; Art at the Edge at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Directions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.  HISTORY    MATRIX  was first conceived of by James Elliott, director of the Atheneum from 1966 to 1976, as a program that would provide a greater public understanding of contemporary art through frequently changing, small-scale exhibitions, lectures, publications, gallery talks, and performance events.  Sculptor Tony Smith suggested the name MATRIX , “with an emphasis on the definition of it as a space within which something else originates or develops.”  Andrea Miller-Keller became the first  MATRIX Gallery coordinator and would continue in that role as the Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art until 1998. Nicholas Baume headed the program as Curator from 1998 to 2003, followed by Joanna Marsh who served as Acting Curator and Associate Curator of Contemporary Art from 2003 until 2007.  Curator Patricia Hickson leads the program today.  Since its first exhibition in January 1975,  MATRIX has shown more than one thousand works of art by more than 150 artists.  For many distinguished artists, including Richard Tuttle, Neil Jenney, Jonathan Borofsky, Daniel Buren, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Nancy Spero, Louise Lawler, Barbara Kruger, Gerhard Richter, Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, and Glenn Ligon, their  MATRIX  show at the Wadsworth Atheneum was their first one-person museum exhibition in the United States.  Half of the artists have been in their thirties or younger, and more than one-third did not have an affiliation with a commercial gallery at the time of their  MATRIX  experience.  Frequently, the  MATRIX  program has invited the participation of guest curators such as Edward Albee, Lawrence Alloway, Michael Auping, Richard Field, Constance Lewallen, John Paoletti, Carter Ratcliff, Judith Rohrer, Mark Rosenthal, and Samuel Wagstaff, Jr.   MATRIX  lectures emphasize the artists’ development, and focus on works presented in the gallery.  Some of the most popular lectures – each having drawn a crowd of more than 300 people – include talks by Jennifer Bartlett, Duane Michaels, Carl Andre, Christo, Soviet artists Vitali Komar and Aleksandr Melamid (their first public appearances), Cindy Sherman, Robert Mapplethorpe, William Wegman, and the Guerilla Girls.  MATRIX  artist sheets,” explanatory publications written to be accessible to the general public, outline the aesthetic, historical, and critical issues raised by each exhibition, and are often based on interviews with the artists.  
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.   
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.
   Odd Lots Series: Hartford/ Fiction (fiction), Detail view,   2010, ink, acrylic paint and vinyl on wall, ceiling and floor, 123.5 x 87 inches.
   Fax Drawing #4 (SECONDroom, Brussels) ,   2008, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for an exhibition with SECONDroom Gallery in Brussels. They exhibited all of the Fax Drawings to date.
     Fax Drawing #2 (Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica)      2007, pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions variable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for the Sam Francis Gallery, Crossroads, Santa Monica.
 Pool Side Chat: Googie and Social Realism in 7/8 time,  2005, Carved lines into plaster wall coated with chalkboard paint, gouache, and pencil, 123.5 x 189 inches/ 313.69 x 480.06 cm  Created for Surface Charge- an exhibition of works made directly on the wall at Anderson Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. The architectural elements are from Prague and Los Angeles. I had just finished participating in the Prague Biennale and was exploring some of the source material from that project.  MOCA  La now owns the large center drawing.
   Fax Drawing #1 (Jail gallery, Los Angeles)    2007, Pen and acrylic on wall, dimensions varriable  The fax drawing series started when I accidentally loaded the paper the wrong way in my fax machine. I had asked a gallery to send floor plans to prepare for an installation. I was using recycled xeroxes of drawings and the result was a combination of the two.  The fax drawings are always installed including all the information on the page, which includes the fax number, date, pages, etc. The only choice I make is regarding color.  This one was created for Jail Gallery, Los Angeles, Ca.
   Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes) ,   2007, Marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable  Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the  MCA  now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.
 Detail view of second half of the wall for    Chicago Series: #10 (Previous Episodes)  ,  2007, marker, acrylic paint and oil stick on wall with framed photographs and text, dimensions variable  Created for Mapping the Self exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, this work used photographs I took as a child as the source material for the architectural drawing and a walk I would do as a child as the line that expands out of the drawing. I grew up in the neighborhood where the  MCA  now stands and the early photos were for a school project where I innocently documented and described the changes in my neighborhood. I had kept the photos and description cards for all these years because I found it interesting that as a small child I would choose to document what we now call gentrification. The green area is the shape of the linear drawing inverted, echoing the inversion of the neighborhood from brownstones to skyscrapers.
     Diving Board Helix       2005, Gouache with oil stick on wall, 137 x 80 inches/ 347.98 x 203.2 cm
    7/8 Time Series: Roadside Destination (wide angle)    2005, Pen, pastel, and oil pastel on wall and floor, 72 x 264 inches/ 182.88 x 670.56 cm